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Fantasy Draft Big Board for 2022

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Rookie drafts are approaching, here is Joey The Tooth’s Offense and IDP Fantasy Draft Big Board.


Here at IDP Guys, we do our annual draft profile magazine. This year I decided to take it a bit further and create a fantasy draft big board consisting of the top fantasy players available in the 2022 draft. If you would like to order our Rookie Draft magazine that has complete profiles of all of these prospects and more, click the link here.

Be sure you subscribe to IDPGUYS as well, for all of the added articles and tools to win your fantasy football leagues. Considering that Superflex is the most popular type of league right now, this is based on a Superflex league. Here is my 2022 fantasy draft big board!

1. Breece Hall, RB, Iowa State

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“Hall continues to have a well-built frame with power in his lower body to blow through contact. He is a patient runner with good vision and instincts. For his size, Hall is explosive and a solid interior runner. Hall gets to the offensive line in a hurry and gets through the trash and into the second level.”

-Mike Valverde

2) Garrett Wilson, WR, Ohio State

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“Garrett Wilson is the best all-around prospect in this wide receiver class and, in my opinion, the one most ready to come in and play right away. His route running is great and he can succeed at all three levels when he is being targeted. Wilson’s quickness and technique allow him to be able to gain separation to be open quickly for the quarterback.”

-Brandon Haye

3) Treylon Burks, WR, Arkansas

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The most notable attribute Burks possesses is his undeniable size — he is a matchup problem. He uses his size to shield defenders from the ball but has also shown that he can high point the ball against defenders on 50/50 balls. Burks is a big-bodied receiver with absolutely massive hands, which helps him with blocks and securing the ball after the catch.”

-Eric LeClerc

4) Drake London, WR, USC

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“Drake London is a monster against man coverage. His size is well-utilized to dominate smaller defensive backs and create ample space to move. His catch radius is downright terrifying. You will hear about his basketball background ad nauseam throughout the draft process, but it really does translate in his case.”

-Bo McBrayer

5) Malik Willis, QB, Liberty

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Mechanically, he has solid footwork, holds the ball high, and has a quick release that will improve with NFL coaching. As a runner, Willis has elite acceleration and outstanding instincts. In the open field, he’s a nightmare for would-be tacklers.”

– Joel Wirth

6) Kenneth Walker III, RB, Michigan State

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“I love his lack of wasted motion when evading defenders, especially in the open field. Walker does not dance around or juke a lot while running but instead combines his excellent cutting ability and speed with aggression to bowl past defenders for chunk plays.”

-Evan Brown

7) Chris Olave, WR, Ohio State

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Olave is a very smooth athlete that surprises you with his game speed which is certainly more than adequate. He may not be a “burner” but definitely fast enough to keep defenders honest. One of the better route runners in the class, he boasts a fairly mature route tree and can be utilized all over the field.”

– Evan Brown 

8) Jameson Williams, WR, Alabama

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“Speed is the first and most obvious strength Williams possesses when you think about his game. It is not just speed, it is game-wrecking speed. He is incredibly smooth as an athlete and he gets up to top gear deceptively quickly with his initial burst.”

-Evan Brown

9) Sam Howell, QB, North Carolina

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“Sam Howell has a Howitzer for an arm. Not only does he throw an incredible deep ball, but he has also demonstrated touch and anticipation on downfield passes that are lost on his contemporaries. Downfield passing isn’t just nine routes and posts. Howell drives the ball down the field on deep crossers, corners, and comebacks.”

-Bo McBrayer

10) Jahan Dotson, WR, Penn State

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“Dotson is a quick-twitch receiver with terrific lateral agility. He possesses great footwork at the line of scrimmage to provide an excellent release creating quick separation. Dotson’s footwork at the line of scrimmage keeps press coverage off of his chest allowing a free release. ”

-Joseph Haggan

11) George Pickens, WR, Georgia

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“Pickens is a solid route runner at both the short and intermediate levels, with crisp cuts and a fairly mature route tree. One of his most noticeable strengths is his near-elite contested-catch capability, massive catch radius, and body control. ”

– Evan Brown

12) Matt Corral, QB, Ole Miss

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“Corral is able to make a quick decision on play-action and RPO plays to get the ball out accurately and quickly to the player across the middle. Another big strength is his mobility — he is able to get first downs on scrambles and designed QB runs. Corral uses his mobility in the pocket to extend plays and is also very good at off-platform plays.”

– Brandon Haye

13) Aidan Hutchinson, Edge, Michigan

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“Hutchinson displays excellent use of hand counters to go along with his array of pass rush moves. I thought he was very effective mixing in his inside swim move, outside feint,  inside jab, and dip and rip move to the outside shoulder. As a run defender, Hutchinson is stout and disciplined. He displayed the ability to both set the edge on the outside and hold his own on the interior when kicked inside.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

14) Desmond Ridder, QB, Cincinnati

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“Flush with outstanding traits and the provocative film to back them up, Cincinnati’s Desmond Ridder has all of the credentials to be regarded among 2022’s top quarterback prospects. Whether it be a stalwart four-year career at Cincinnati, a conspicuous display at the Senior Bowl, or exceptional metrics at the NFL Combine, Ridder simply shows out each and every time he is called upon.”

– Jayson Snyder

15) Isaiah Spiller, RB, Texas A&M

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“His cutting ability and shiftiness are not something you expect from a bigger back. Spiller has a beautiful jump cut that allows him to quickly change direction and make defenders look silly. His vision and patience behind the line allow him to run through holes without necessarily having to use his natural strength to plow through defenders.”

-Isuf Gega

16) Christian Watson, WR, North Dakota State

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“He boasts excellent body control to combine with his size and speed and makes acrobatic catches look graceful — almost effortless at times. He showed excellent versatility at NDSU being utilized all over the field — in the slot as well as out wide, on jet sweeps, kick returns, and even taking some reps at running back.”

– Evan Brown

17) Devin Lloyd, LB, Utah

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A strong tackler with good instincts and range, Lloyd excels at attacking downhill and can cover the field sideline-to-sideline. His strength/length also aid Lloyd in shedding blocks, which pairs well with his ability to navigate through traffic.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

18) Skyy Moore, WR, Western Michigan

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“Moore is only 5’10 but is very good at tracking the ball down the field and high pointing the ball against tight coverage. He shows off great hands and does not allow the ball to go into his body very much when he is targeted.”

– Brandon Haye

19) Kayvon Thibodeaux, Edge, Oregon

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“At 6’5” and 258 lbs, Thibodeaux has the ideal size for an NFL edge rusher. He has a powerful bullrush to go along with an arsenal of technical moves to get after the quarterback. Thibodeaux’s initial burst off the line is exceptional! Combined with his constant hand fighting, he creates plenty of pressure and sack opportunities.”

– Alistair Hosie

20) Kyle Hamilton, Safety, Notre Dame

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He matches that with upper-level athleticism and incredible processing with a tremendous IQ. His feel for the game is uncanny and can play on every level of the defense. He has very good snap timing that he uses to blitz and get into the backfield while pass rushing and even in run defense.”

– Joseph Haggan

21) Nakobe Dean, LB, Georgia

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“Dean’s instincts are top-notch and so is his speed to play in space. With today’s spread offenses, his skills are in high demand. Dean is quick to diagnose the run and is vicious in his pursuit of the ball carrier. He can stick with any RB out of the backfield in coverage and can play in zone coverage as well.”

– Alistair Hosie

22) Rachaad White, RB, Arizona State

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“White has great hands and can make contested catches at times, certainly one of the better pass-catching backs in this class. He may not be overly explosive, but he has solid vision and is a decisive runner who can get his foot in the ground when he spots a running lane. ”

– Evan Brown

23) Khalil Shakir, WR, Boise State

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“Khalil Shakir has an impressive release package that makes it incredibly tough to press him at the line of scrimmage. His footwork is incredibly impressive and has an innate ability at creating quick separation. Shakir does a great job manipulating defensive backs into missteps and then making crisp breaks creating excellent separation.”

– Joseph Haggan

24) David Bell, WR, Purdue

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His agility and footwork allow him to change directions suddenly and find daylight. Bell is also never shy about crossing the middle of the field, using his size and body positioning to bounce off hard hits and gain extra yardage without sacrificing ball security. Bell’s release package is the best in this class, bar none.”

– Bo McBrayer

25) George Karlaftis, Edge, Purdue

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“Karlaftis has an unbelievable and impressive combination of both size and athleticism. At nearly 275 pounds, he has incredible flexibility and bend. Pair that with explosiveness and power, and that combination allows him to win at all levels of the defensive line. Karlaftis’ grip and rip moves are violent and he tosses opposing linemen around like ragdolls, showing impressive strength in his hands.”

– Joseph Haggan

26) Dameon Pierce, RB, Florida

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“Pierce is a very solidly built running back who runs with determination and tenacity. He is more likely to try and run through you than to go around you. He is very good at the goal line, gets his pads low, and drives with his legs. ”

– Evan Brown

27) Kenny Pickett, QB, Pittsburgh

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“Pickett makes progressions with the ball in his hand as he scans the field. There is confidence with a command of the offense. He is a fiery competitor by hanging in the pocket and battling to keep plays alive. ”

– Mike Valverde

28) Trey McBride, TE, Colorado State

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“Trey McBride is a bully on the field. His technique and athleticism merge into one heck of a football player at one of the toughest positions to acclimate to out of college. McBride is savvy and aggressive in his route running. He has very strong hands and “plays to the whistle” after the catch.”

– Bo McBrayer

29) Jermaine Johnson II, Edge, Florida State

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“Versatility is a hallmark to Johnson’s game, as he can rush the passer from either end of the defensive front, attack with an upright posture or from a traditional three-point stance, and deftly disrupt both run and pass formations.”

– Jayson Snyder

30) Justyn Ross, WR, Clemson

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“He caught several off-target passes he had no business catching and often made circus catches. Ross dominated 2019 Alabama in the National Championship to the tune of over 150 receiving yards. He frequently finds the soft spot in zone defenses and shows good nuance when in the slot.”

– Michael Sicoli

31) Jalen Tolbert, WR, South Alabama

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“Tolbert is very good at high pointing the ball down the field and is able to come down with tough catches. He does not body catch the ball and has good technique in catching with his hands not allowing defenders to knock the ball out. ”

– Brandon Haye

32) Christian Harris, LB, Alabama

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On film, Harris’ explosiveness is immediately evident. Though no slouch in pass coverage, it’s as a blitzer where he provides the greatest spark. Whether manipulating gaps in protections or executing a powerful stab, Harris can adroitly penetrate a backfield.”

– Jayson Snyder

33) Carson Strong, QB, Nevada

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One glaring characteristic in Carson Strong’s game is his sheer arm talent. Many analysts have drawn comparisons to Washington State’s Ryan Leaf and Drew Bledsoe, each of whom could make any and every throw on the field look effortless.”

– Bo McBrayer

34) Calvin Austin III, WR, Memphis

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He releases quickly against the press when running his stem, which led to back-to-back 1,000-yard seasons. An impressive glide can surprise coverages, and Austin reads the defense. Austin will find openings for his quarterbacks during scramble drills. Has loose hips to elude coverage in short to intermediate area routes.”

– Mike Valverde

35) John Metchie III, WR, Alabama

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“John Metchie excels with the ball in his hands. His speed and agility are paired with intelligent route running for a slightly undersized receiver. Metchie does well to set up the top of his routes with explosive breaks to gain separation. One false move or missed assignment on defense could instantly become a touchdown with Metchie.”

– Bo McBrayer

36) Pierre Strong Jr., RB, South Dakota State

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“He is a very smooth runner with solid vision who certainly has enough short-area burst to hit the hole or get to the outside when required. Strong has good patience allowing his blocks to develop before accelerating when he sees his opening. He does not waste a lot of time dancing around behind the line of scrimmage.”

– Evan Brown

37) Jaquan Brisker, Safety, Penn State

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“Jaquan Brisker is the toolbox every NFL defensive coordinator would love to have at safety. The most versatile safety in this class, Brisker can do anything asked of him at a high level. Whether you need a box safety to support against the run, a deep safety in pass coverage, a robber to disrupt slants and crossing routes, or a slot blitzer to pressure the quarterback, Brisker can do it all and do it well.”

– Joel Wirth

38) Leo Chenal, LB, Wisconsin

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“A player who makes his presence known in the box, Chenal excels at getting downhill and filling run gaps with authority. His power, instincts, and relentless motor all contribute to Chenal being such an effective run defender. Quite simply, if he gets his hands on you, that’s a wrap.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

39) Wan’Dale Robinson, WR, Kentucky

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“Robinson’s biggest strength is his speed and elusiveness in the open field. This year, at Kentucky, they used him more as a WR and it paid dividends to his strengths. Being moved around quite a bit on offense allowed for Robinson to get good releases and he showed that he can get off the line against press, off man, and zone coverage.”

– Brandon Haye

40) Travon Walker, Edge, Georgia

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“With Walker’s powerful hands and ability to convert speed to power quickly, his bull rush can overwhelm opposing linemen. Playing effectively both on the edge and interior during his time at Georgia, Walker offers an exciting amount of versatility. He’s not only a handful off the edge, but can be a mismatch in one-on-one situations on the interior.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

41) Cameron Thomas, Edge, San Diego State

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“He does a great job getting skinny on the interior, then knifes his way into the backfield. Thomas’ inside swim move is mesmerizing, leaving linemen stiff-legged and stuck in the ground. He then mixes an outside feint that leads to his swim move on other occasions, showing a plethora of pass rush techniques in his repertoire.”

– Joseph Haggan

42) Chad Muma, LB, Wyoming

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Muma is a high-level IQ player, showcasing fantastic pre-snap processing, allowing him to read and react to plays with intensity and purpose. He is patient in his run defense, allowing gaps to materialize while making hard breaks to fill those gaps. His tackling technique is sound and Muma rarely misses tackles, taking great angles to minimize the round necessary to get to the ball carrier.”

– Joseph Haggan

43) Romeo Doubs, WR, Nevada

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Being a deep-threat, he tracks the ball well and adjusts accordingly. He possesses strong hands that he uses when rising up over the defender to pluck the ball out of the air. In open space, he has good feet and acceleration causing defenders to have to adjust quickly or risk getting beat.”

– Eric LeClerc

44) Tyler Allgeier, RB, BYU

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“Allgeier is built like a refrigerator and uses his squatty 5’11”, 224-pound frame to shed tackles with ease. There is an obvious understanding of balance and leverage in his game. Allgeier’s pad level and forward lean shrink his tackling target area and margin of error for defenders.”

– Bo McBrayer

45) David Ojabo, Edge, Michigan

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Ojabo possesses elite speed for a man of his size and uses a lot of stutter steps to get past linemen and pursue the quarterback. His explosion off the line will get him on the field early in obvious passing downs. He often uses a dip and rip move with great effectiveness and mixes in a spin move from time to time.”

– Alistair Hosie

46) Kingsley Enagbare, Edge, South Carolina

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“Enagbare has extreme power and speed coming off the edge. He has a tremendous first step and snap timing and, when he plays with leverage, he can be very difficult to handle and provides overwhelming pressure. Enagbare’s burst off the edge is fantastic, also showing above average bend and flexibility to successfully speed rush around the corner.”

– Joseph Haggan

47) Jalen Pitre, Safety, Baylor

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Pitre played a unique “STAR” position in the Baylor defense, which is, at the most base level, a LB/S hybrid. This role required Pitre to be incredibly astute at reading the opposition. He deploys a trademark combination of preparation and instinct to disrupt an offense.”

– Jayson Snyder

48) Jerome Ford, RB, Cincinnati

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“Jerome Ford is a running back that possesses a lot of things you want in an NFL workhorse back. He shows good balance to bounce off defenders and can push through contact to get the extra yards. Ford had plenty of long runs, but most were well blocked or ran through a couple of arm tackles.”

– Brandon Haye

49) Alec Pierce, WR, Cincinnati

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The first thing people will tell you about Pierce is that he always wins at the catch point. He’s an impressive athlete with his 40-yard-dash time, speed and burst scores, and catch radius all falling inside the 90th percentile of prospects.”

– Michael Sicoli

50) Arnold Ebiketie, Edge, Penn State

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“Ebiketie has a great build with very good length coming off the edge. He has terrific hand technique when battling with offensive linemen, getting underneath their pad level allowing him to gain leverage and use powerful leg drive that transfers into a bull rush collapsing the pocket.”

– Joseph Haggan

51) Andrew Booth Jr., CB, Clemson

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Booth is a fiery competitor who fights every play till the whistle is blown. His body is incredibly fluid in coverage with a smooth hip flip and body transition. Booth has little wasted movement with great short-area quickness that helps him stick with shifty receivers on intermediate routes.”

– Joseph Haggan

52) James Cook, RB, Georgia

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“While his current size makes him a little light for a lead-back type roll at the next level, Cook runs with surprising power and good vision. His speed and pass-catching are the two most obvious feathers in his cap at this moment in time. Cook doesn’t just catch dump-offs in the flat, he can run routes and even make contested catches.”

– Evan Brown

53) Boye Mafe, Edge, Minnesota

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“Mafe possesses great short-area quickness with a strong initial burst with good acceleration coming off the backside of a play in pursuit. He is an incredibly fluid athlete throughout his entire frame, showing great bend to flatten out on the edge.”

– Joseph Haggan

54) Brian Robinson Jr., RB, Alabama

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“Robinson is one of the bruisers in this draft class. He is a large specimen of a man and he knows how to use that frame. Robinson is more likely to try and run through you than to go around you. He is a decisive runner with solid — if not spectacular — vision who initiates contact with his downhill style.”

– Evan Brown

55) Zamir White, RB, Georgia

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“White is a “between the tackles” banger with the speed to take any run to the house. He was a track star in high school, and his knee injuries haven’t sapped his athleticism. White tested very well at the combine and his Georgia tape confirms his top-end speed and leg strength. He is difficult to bring down, driving his legs and always falling forward for extra yardage.”

– Joel Wirth

56) Kyren Williams, RB, Notre Dame

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“He’s an excellent receiver, showing good hands and route-running ability, and is a very good pass blocker, which will allow him to stay on the field in all situations. Williams’ 40 yard dash time at the combine may have been disappointing, but he showed enough functional game speed to outrun defenders to the end zone while at South Bend.”

– Joel Wirth

 

57) Lewis Cine, Safety, Georgia

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He has very good closing speed and makes strong breaks on the football when he diagnoses the play correctly. His downhill run support is violent and routinely packs a hard hit. He has very good tackling technique as well, shooting gaps and wrapping up ball carriers, negating yards after contact.”

– Joseph Haggan

58) Ahmad Gardner, CB, Cincinnati

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“Sauce has more than ideal size and physical strength. He’s a lock-down corner who ranges sideline to sideline using his long stride to get where he needs to be in a hurry. Gardner is a nightmare on contested catches — he attacks the ball in the air, unlike many other prospects. He has elite ball skills paired with hands that seem like they’re covered in super glue.”

– Eric LeClerc

59) Drake Jackson, Edge, USC

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“He shows bouncy lateral agility with quick side-to-side movement to fill rushing lanes. Jackson’s athletic traits are overwhelming to compete with and, when he wins with his initial step, it instantly puts opposing linemen on their heels. He is smooth and effortless dropping into coverage and understands the depths of zone coverage.”

– Joseph Haggan

60) Brian Asamoah, LB, Oklahoma

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An athletic linebacker with good speed, Asamoah can cover the field sideline-to-sideline. To go along with his range, Asamoah is an aggressive player who gets downhill quickly when he makes his read. When he chooses correctly, Asamoah displays good burst filling gaps versus the run game.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

61) Myjai Sanders, Edge, Cincinnati

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“When the blocker becomes overconfident in an outside move, Sanders will mix in a devastating jump cut to the inside, keeping his opponent off balance. It’s this unique blend of twitch and acceleration that had his peers consistently rating him one of the toughest college edge rushers to block during Combine availabilities.”

– Jayson Snyder

62) Travis Jones, IDL, UConn

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“Jones is an incredibly powerful player. His initial punch is devastating showing cinder blocks for hands. Jones follows up that powerful punch with great hand placement getting underneath opposing linemen’s pad level. He then uses an impressive leg drive creating a fierce bull rush that drives opposing linemen into the backfield keeping them off balance.”

– Joseph Haggan

63) Kerby Joseph, Safety, Illinois

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His jam is quick and strong at the line of scrimmage and he flips his hips with smooth fluidity, transitioning into pursuit effortlessly. Joseph’s ability to read a quarterback and his quick closing speed have been traits that have turned him into a ball-hawking safety on the back end.”

– Joseph Haggan

64) Cade Otton, TE, Washington

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He holds his blocks well and pushes on to the second level engaging secondary blocks to help establish the run game. He is a smooth route runner and shows solid ability to catch the ball in stride at both the shorter and intermediate levels. Otton boasts soft hands and can catch most passes thrown his way, tracking the ball extremely well for a tight end.”

– Evan Brown

65) JoJo Domann, LB, Nebraska

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Domann’s fluid change of direct capability and instincts aid him in being effective when dropping in zone coverages. He also spent some time out in the slot and flashed the ability to successfully hold up in man-to-man situations as well. With his standout coverage skills, Domann could find his way onto the field early on in sub-package looks.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

66) Troy Andersen, LB, Montana State

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As a former quarterback, he shows a very good understanding of routes while in coverage, showing an innate ability to undercut routes and make plays on the football. He has a thick frame at 242-pounds that is matched with great speed as Andersen was a high school track star with two state titles.”

– Joseph Haggan

67) Derek Stingley Jr., CB, LSU

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“Stingley is ultra-athletic and it’s a shame he couldn’t test at the combine. The drills they run there are made for a guy with his talents to separate themselves from the track stars. I think Stingley just wasn’t all the way back to being in peak shape and didn’t want to hurt his draft stock.”

– Alistair Hosie

68) Tyquan Thornton, WR, Baylor

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“At the combine, he showed he has blazing speed and you can see that on tape where he takes the top off the defense or takes a short slant the distance for a TD. Thornton is smooth in and out of breaks and is good at high pointing the ball, but needs work on consistently breaking press coverage.”

– Brandon Haye

69) Kyle Phillips, WR, UCLA

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Kyle Philips is a redshirt junior slot receiver for the UCLA Bruins. He is sort of a poor man’s Hunter Renfrow if “the man” was borderline homeless levels of poor. He does not currently possess Renfrow’s sharp route running or sure hands.”

– Evan Brown

70) Josh Paschal, Edge, Kentucky

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When watching Paschal’s tape I immediately appreciated the amount of power he possesses in his upper and lower halves. Paschal also has serious knockback power in his hands, which pairs very well with his quick get-off. He gets on opposing blockers quickly and can overwhelm them instantly with his strength.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

71) Daxton Hill, Safety, Michigan

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Hill’s instincts not only show up making reads in coverage, but he’s also effective coming up in run support. While he’s not the biggest player, Hill isn’t afraid to come up aggressively in run support and get into somebody. Hill also has the speed and range to effectively play from depth, with the ability to hold down the back end.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

72) Bryan Cook, Safety, Cincinnati

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Cook’s most impressive trait is his tackling ability. He does a great job getting square to the ball carrier, getting low, and wrapping up both legs, ensuring that the ball carrier does not escape his grasp. This ability provides great relief for the first and second level of the defense, knowing that they have a strong last line of defense.”

– Joseph Haggan

73) Sam Williams, Edge, Ole’ Miss

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Williams has a very powerful upper body packing a strong initial punch and power transfer from his legs to his hands. He wins with his hands at the line as well, showing a great dip and rip move, almost rag-dolling offensive linemen. His bull rush is staggering and easily keeps opposing linemen on their heels.”

– Joseph Haggan

74) Devonte Wyatt, IDL, Georgia

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“Quite simply, Devonte Wyatt is a big man that can move. He’s not only explosive off the snap, but his lateral agility is impressive as he navigates the interior. Wyatt showcases a really good ability to change direction and work across the line as he makes his read while engaged. I also thought he fired out of his stance with good pad level, which aids him in gaining leverage.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

75) Brandon Smith, LB, Penn State

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At 6’3” and 241 pounds, Brandon Smith is well put together with a long, athletic frame for the linebacker position. To go along with his size, Smith is an excellent athlete in all aspects as a player who not only has speed but is also a fluid mover when navigating the field.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

76) Zonovan Knight, RB, NC State

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“Zonovan Knight is nicknamed Bam, and I don’t think there could be a better name for him. He looks for contact and shows the ability to break tackles when he can get his momentum going. Knight does not evade runners in the backfield but shows adequate moves to avoid defenders in the hole for positive gains.”

– Brandon Haye

77) DeAngelo Malone, Edge, Western Kentucky

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Malone is a long, lean, athletic edge defender who fires out of his stance and eats up ground quickly. In the NFL, Malone is likely best fit to rush from the outside in a 3-4 base, as he doesn’t have enough bulk to hold up as a 4-3 end. “

– Kyle Bellefeuil

78) Hassan Haskins, RB, Michigan

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“Haskins runs with tempo and patience. He is a big back with explosion and size — he was listed as an LB his freshman season — with the burst to have a significant role in gap or power run schemes. Haskins is one-cut, north-south, and breaks arm tackles. He has good but not great hands out of the backfield when making catches.”

– Mike Valverde

79) Damone Clark, LB, LSU

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He is a plus pass rusher with a good burst which should translate him to being a good blitzer at the next level. His burst also shows up in his run defense while shooting gaps, showing an innate ability at getting into the backfield for tackles for a loss.”

– Joseph Haggan

80) Channing Tindall, LB, Georgia

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From a size standpoint, Tindall is well built, owning a strong frame that allows him to play with a physical edge. Not only is Tindall a player who hits with serious pop, but as I stated earlier about his Combine performance, he’s athletically gifted. His speed and explosiveness are easily apparent on tape and provide Tindall with legit sideline-to-sideline range.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

81) Isaiah Likely, TE, Coastal Carolina

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“Likely has great hands and is a very fluid athlete that is a matchup nightmare at the tight end position. When he gets in space, he is not going to be caught by safeties or linebackers that much up with him. Likely can line up at various positions as he was put in motion from the backfield, slot, and even out wide on occasion.”

– Brandon Haye

82) Logan Hall, IDL/Edge, Houston

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“Hall is remarkably lean for his massive size. He strikes an imposing profile and can utilize that bulk to devastating effect. Hall explodes off of the line and utilizes violent hands to manufacture operational space. He possesses a full array of pass rush moves, but the swim move and bull rush are his most potent. Versatility is key to understanding Hall’s value.”

– Jayson Snyder

83) Tyler Badie, RB, Missouri

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“With solid vision and the ability to work in a gap or zone blocking scheme, Badie is very twitchy and possesses quick-cutting lateral agility. He is a natural pass-catcher with solid hands who immediately looks to get upfield with the ball.”

– Evan Brown

84) Bo Melton, WR, Rutgers

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Melton is a route running tactician. His footwork, in particular, stands out as exemplary. Dedication to his craft allows him to execute across the route tree with proficiency. Recognizing Melton’s versatility, Rutgers capitalized on his multiplicity as both an outside and interior slot target.”

– Jayson Snyder

85) Jelani Woods, TE, Virginia

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Physical dominance and raw athleticism are two traits that Woods possesses in bucketloads. (He ran the second-fastest 40 time of any tight end at the NFL combine and posted the best bench press reps.) Woods is absolutely terrifying in the open field and is a Yards After Catch monster, with defensive backs at a complete disadvantage trying to tackle him at the 3rd level.”

– Evan Brown

86) Nick Cross, Safety, Maryland

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The first thing that caught my eye with Cross was how quickly he can close once he commits to his read. This is especially apparent when he’s coming up from depth against the run. Cross then put his speed on full display at the combine running a blazing 4.34 second 40 to lead the entire safety group.”

– Kyle Bellefeuil

87) Bailey Zappe, QB, Western Kentucky

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Zappe has produced wherever he has gone in the high-volume passing attack schemes. He is a confident passer as he will deliver the ball into tight windows and spread the ball with multiple receivers. He has an adequate processor and release. Zappe has a nice touch to his ball with good placement to attack defenders in the middle or deep down the field.”

– Mike Valverde

88) Amare Barno, Edge, Virginia Tech

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His snap timing is quick and he displays excellent lateral agility in pursuit and contain to the sideline. He also shows a flexible body with good dip and bend in his hips. His length is on display allowing him to create and hold separation on offensive linemen, keeping them off his chest. It is that length that allows him to wrap up consistently and has an enormous tackle radius.”

– Joseph Haggan

89) Greg Dulcich, TE, UCLA

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Also of significance, the talented tight end is not athletically inhibited by his size. Dulcich can get ‘over the top’ on a defense, using deceptive velocity to create separation. Acceleration and tremendous straight-line speed are indeed hallmarks to his game.”

– Jayson Snyder

90) Tyler Goodson, RB, Iowa

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“Goodson is a very good receiver and can be lined up in the slot and shows very good hands along with sound technique. His sharp cuts on angle routes are deadly and allow him to consistently win against linebackers. As he showed at the combine, he has great speed and uses it well to go outside and can get around the corner.”

– Brandon Haye

91) Quay Walker, LB, Georgia

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On film, Walker takes full advantage of his herculean athletic gifts. His unique frame makes him ideally suited to versatility. With sufficient bulk to operate primarily out of a thumping middle linebacker role, he is also speedy enough to flex seamlessly to either outside linebacker spot.”

– Jayson Snyder

92) Jordan Davis, IDL, Georgia

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93) Dontario Drummond, WR, Ole’ Miss

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“Drummond possesses solid, if not spectacular, hands and a decent ability to track the ball in flight and readjust when necessary for the catch. He is fairly adept at finding soft spots in zone coverage and presenting a large target for the quarterback as a second or third read. ”

– Evan Brown

94) Jalen Wydermyer, TE, Texas A&M

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“Wydermyer is a tough player to tackle, and he runs with a low pad level. He will run through arm tackles and run deeper routes like a wide receiver while creating separation with a full route tree that he executes crisply and is a dominant blocker. Wydermyer will use his height in the red zone and outjump defenders. ”

– Mike Valverde

95) Kaleb Eleby, QB, Western Michigan

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“Eleby throws with nice zip over the middle and looks most comfortable when throwing in rhythm on his drops. In the Western Michigan offense, he played both in shotgun and under center, so he is a step ahead of other quarterbacks coming out of college. He also does a good job of adapting ball velocity and showing touch underneath and putting air on deep throws.”

– Brandon Haye

96) Keaontay Ingram, RB, USC

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“Ingram possesses prototypical size for a three-down running back at the NFL level. While not a battering ram, he certainly has some power to his running style and continues to push for extra yardage. Ingram has developed solid vision and complimentary patience as a runner, waiting for his blocks to develop before hitting the running lane.”

– Evan Brown

97) Darrian Beavers, LB, Cincinnati

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He has a motor that burns red hot, constantly applying pressure on the offense. Beavers comes downhill like a fireball, shooting gaps as they open. He has plus lateral agility to aid in side-stepping blocks and filling gaps in the defense, limiting running backs from gaining extra yardage.”

– Joseph Haggan

98) Trent McDuffie, CB, Washington

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“Trent McDuffie is an elite athlete who seems to play the game at a consistently higher level than his competitors. A top-tier athleticism with the intangibles to match, McDuffie has both the suddenness and the explosiveness to make up ground on any player. He can play outside or in the nickel.”

– Eric LeClerc

99) Kyler Gordon, CB, Washington

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” He’s twitchy, fast, and explosive. Gordon plays with an energy that pops on tape. Not only is he quick, but he’s also silky smooth. Gordon has a background in dance and martial arts which keeps him balanced and dynamic at a moment’s notice.”

– Eric LeClerc

100) Jeremy Ruckert, TE, Ohio State

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Ruckert has a muscular body as a move tight end with a great height-weight-speed ratio. He excels as a blocker, racing across the formation to flatten defenders with aggression, and has the burst upfield to dominate at the second level. Also, Ruckert is versatile as he can line up at an inline tight end, H-back, and in the slot.”

– Mike Valverde

Summary

After so much disdain around this draft class, I honestly am a big fan of it, especially on the IDP side of the football with value screaming all the way through the end of rookie drafts. Hopefully, this fantasy draft big board helps in some way, shape, or form. I would like to personally thank all the writers involved in our draft magazine that helped make this fantasy draft big board possible. Here’s to 2022!


Thank you for checking out my article! Follow me on Twitter at @JoeyTheToothIDP, and check out all of my IDP, Devy, and Offensive work on my IDP Guys author page. Stay up to date with the latest breaking news in fantasy football with The IDPGuys!

Joseph Haggan

I am the proud father to an amazing young girl and husband to an unbelievable wife. Senior writer for IDPGuys, as well as projections creator and co-founder of our elite IDP Scoring Tool.
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